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Official Report From The London Convention On Ocean Fertilization

The London Convention and London Protocol have officially posted the report from the meeting held in late October 2008. This includes a Resolution on the Regulation of Ocean Fertilization, which exempts legitimate scientific research on OIF from being considered "dumping" of pollution.  This is a postive step for those who want to see continued research into OIF as a potential climate mitigation technique. The Resolution also calls for the development of a scientific review panel to assess the legitimacy and safety of proposed ocean fertilization projects.


The full text of the Resolution is here:

RESOLUTION LC-LP.1 (2008) ON THE REGULATION OF OCEAN FERTILIZATION

(ADOPTED ON 31 OCTOBER 2008)

THE THIRTIETH MEETING OF THE CONTRACTING PARTIES TO THE LONDON
CONVENTION AND THE THIRD MEETING OF THE CONTRACTING PARTIES TO
THE LONDON PROTOCOL,

RECALLING the objectives of the London Convention1 and Protocol2;

NOTING that the ‘Statement of concern’ on large-scale ocean fertilization by the
Scientific Groups in June 2007 endorsed by the 29th Consultative Meeting and the 2nd Meeting of
Contracting Parties in November 2007, and expanded on by the Scientific Groups in May 2008,
remains valid;

NOTING decision IX/16 on 30 May 2008 of the 9th Meeting of the Conference of the
Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity which “requests Parties and urges other
Governments, in accordance with the precautionary approach, to ensure that ocean fertilization
activities do not take place until there is an adequate scientific basis on which to justify such
activities, including assessing associated risks, and a global, transparent and effective control and
regulatory mechanism is in place for these activities; with the exception of small scale scientific
research studies within coastal waters”;

NOTING United Nations General Assembly resolution 62/215, concerning “Oceans and
the law of the sea”, adopted on 22 December 2007, which in its paragraph 98 “encourages States
to support the further study and enhance understanding of ocean iron fertilization”;

NOTING that a number of other international organizations are considering the issue of
ocean fertilization;

NOTING that knowledge on the effectiveness and potential environmental impacts of
ocean fertilization is currently insufficient to justify activities other than legitimate scientific
research;

1. AGREE that the scope of the London Convention and Protocol includes ocean
fertilization activities;

2. AGREE that for the purposes of this resolution, ocean fertilization is any activity
undertaken by humans with the principle intention of stimulating primary productivity in
the oceans3;

3. AGREE that in order to provide for legitimate scientific research, such research should
be regarded as placement of matter for a purpose other than the mere disposal thereof
under Article III.1(b)(ii) of the London Convention and Article 1.4.2.2 of the London
Protocol;

4. AGREE that scientific research proposals should be assessed on a case-by-case basis
using an assessment framework to be developed by the Scientific Groups under the
London Convention and Protocol;

5. AGREE that the aforementioned assessment framework should include, inter alia, tools
for determining whether the proposed activity is contrary to the aims of the Convention
and Protocol;

6. AGREE that until specific guidance is available, Contracting Parties should be urged to
use utmost caution and the best available guidance4 to evaluate the scientific research
proposals to ensure protection of the marine environment consistent with the Convention
and Protocol;

7. AGREE that for the purposes of this resolution, legitimate scientific research should be
defined as those proposals that have been assessed and found acceptable under the
assessment framework;

8. AGREE that, given the present state of knowledge, ocean fertilization activities other
than legitimate scientific research should not be allowed. To this end, such other
activities should be considered as contrary to the aims of the Convention and Protocol and
not currently qualify for any exemption from the definition of dumping in Article III.1(b)
of the Convention and Article 1.4.2 of the Protocol;

9. AGREE that this resolution should be reviewed at appropriate intervals in light of new
and relevant scientific information and knowledge.



Category: Ocean Fertilization
 
 
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Category
Carbon Market (8)
Climate Change Science (27)
Geoengineering (38)
New Science (5)
Carbon Politics and Legislation (3)
Ocean Fertilization (71)
 
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